Science

Cedar Hill firefighters warn against Amazon solar eclipse glasses

Cedar Hill firefighters warn against Amazon solar eclipse glasses

The Great American Eclipse, the first solar eclipse visible in all of America since 1979, is coming up fast. The SDSU Society of Physics Students will host a campus viewing session near the west entrance to the Student Union Aug. 21 and will have free eclipse glasses available at that location starting the morning of the event. While watching a solar eclipse can be a memorable experience, the ophthalmologists at Yorkshire Eye Clinic stress it should be viewed safely so as not to damage your eyes.

If you received this email from Amazon, there are other places to purchase eclipse glasses.

Staring directly into the sun is can damage your eyes, and would-be eclipse viewers could be purchases and using products that won't properly protect them.

Homemade filters and ordinary sunglasses don't provide enough protection for looking at the sun or the eclipse. The notification also says that customers don't need to return the glasses in order to get a refund.

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"The market is being flooded with counterfeits", he said.

McDonald's locations in OR are on NASA and the American Astronomical Society's list of certified retailers of eclipse glasses, which allow you to safely watch the solar eclipse on August 21. Those glasses were among those that were deemed safe.

To help the community safely view the August 21 eclipse, Yorkshire Eye Clinic is giving away free eclipse glasses on a first-come, first-serve basis.

If Aug. 21 comes and you don't have an approved eclipse viewer, you can always make a free and relatively simple device, like the "vastly underappreciated" pinhole viewer, UW-Madison's Lattis said. "Old fashioned pinhole viewers work just as good. and and they cost nothing".