Arts&Culture

Gabrielle Union opens up about her heartbreaking battle with infertility

Gabrielle Union opens up about her heartbreaking battle with infertility

"I have had eight or nine miscarriages", she writes in the book.

Gabrielle says she has gone through three years of failed IVF cycles and is constantly bloated from the hormones.

Gabrielle Union never wanted to be a mother, but when she married National Basketball Association star Dwyane Wade in 2014 and became a stepmom to his three children, she changed her mind. Although she didn't initially see children in her future, she stated that it wasn't until she became a stepmom that her ideals changed.

Her platform reaches so many people, and sharing her story helps to reduce the stigma around miscarriage and infertility - which will only help other couples going through the same thing. She and Wade "remain bursting with love and ready to do anything to meet the child we've both dreamed of".

Gabrielle Union is opening up about a very personal struggle that many women can relate to. "So far, it has not happened for us", she said.

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Union recalled the rumor-stirring side effects, such as bloating, that would ensue as a result of IVF treatment, serving as a constant reminder of her struggle to conceive in the public eye.

Union goes on to declare how much she now hates baby showers and mothers who endlessly talk about their kids and reporters who speculate about a baby bump and ask questions about her family's future. In fact, a woman's chances of getting pregnant in her 40s decreases by five per cent every month.

The pair are raising Wade's sons Zaire, 15, and Zion, 10, as well as nephew Dahveon Morris, 16, together.

"People who know my fertility issues often hand their babies to me to hold, or text me pictures of babies ("To keep hope alive!" they say)".