Health Care

Sex can rarely trigger Cardiac Arrest: Recent Report

Sex can rarely trigger Cardiac Arrest: Recent Report

"For the last two decades we've been working on how to predict and prevent sudden cardiac arrest".

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart unexpectedly stops beating, due to faulty electrical signaling that affects heart rate.

Sexual activity is rarely associated with sudden cardiac arrest, but it's men who are most at risk, and often they are not revived by their partner.

Researchers led by Sumeet Chugh, MD, associate director of the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, analyzed data from the community-based Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study.

"Sexual activity is just one variable in the whole big picture" of cardiac risks, but one that hasn't been studied in depth, Chugh added. "Now we can tell them the risk is very low". This figure was equal to 0.7% of all cases, and therefore allows to say that sexy load are not the cause of the deaths.

About 19 percent of the patients in sex-related cardiac arrest cases survived their ordeal, compared with an average survival rate of around 10 percent nationwide, he said.

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But overall, sex was linked to only 1 percent of all cardiac arrests that occurred in men. The majority of cases were men who had a previous history of heart diseases.

Goldberg suggested that "doctors really should be discussing this information with their patients to allay their fears they may have after a cardiac diagnosis, that most people return safely to having sexual activity".

Almost 20 percent of the sex-related sudden cardiac arrest patients survived compared to just 12.9 percent of the non-sexual activity-related patients.

But the study found that only a third of people who collapse during sex are likely to receive CPR from their partner. They have also found that in only one in three cases does the overexerted amore receive what cardiologists term "bystander CPR", but what everyone else would term "the very least a considerate lover could do".

Dr Chugh said: "These findings highlight the importance of continued efforts to educate the public on the importance of bystander CPR for sudden cardiac arrest, irrespective of the circumstance".