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Bar Associations Respond to President Donald Trump's 'Repugnant' Policies, Remarks

Bar Associations Respond to President Donald Trump's 'Repugnant' Policies, Remarks

In his meeting with a group of senators, Trump had questioned why the U.S. would accept more immigrants from Haiti and "s**thole countries" in Africa as he rejected a bipartisan immigration deal, according to one participant and others who had been briefed on the remarkable Oval Office conversation.

According to those briefed on the conversation, the president used the phrase * a href="http://abc7chicago.com/politics/trump-why-allow-immigrants-from-s***hole-countries/2930875/" *"s***hole countries" while questioning why the US would accept more immigrants from Haiti and nations in Africa, rather than places like Norway.

A Haitian church in Rockville, Maryland, held a prayer vigil Saturday after President Donald Trump allegedly made obscene comments about Haiti and African countries.

Trump's reported comments were also taken personally by Dr. Andrew Furey, an orthopedic surgeon in St. John's, N.L., and founder of Team Broken Earth, a group of medical professionals who responded to the Haitian quake in 2010 and has since returned to the country several times.

"To no surprise the president tweeted this morning, denying that he used those words", said Durbin.

Mr Durbin added: "When the question was raised about Haitians for example... he said 'Haitians, do we need more Haitians?'"

Hospital bosses warn of long waits at Lincolnshire A&E departments
It has always been obvious that all but the very mildest winter pressures would stretch the NHS mightily, and so it has proved. In a statement, the Trust said: "A&E is for patients requiring emergency care for serious and life-threatening conditions".

He doesn't deny that Trump possibly used the word "shithole" to describe Haiti and Africa, but he believes it's been taken out of context. He also reportedly said Haitians "all have AIDS", according to New York Times. He also claimed the deal would force the United States to "to take large numbers of people from high crime countries which are doing badly", but did not offer any specifics or evidence. Obama has frequently spoken about the importance of respecting the "peaceful transition of power", which helps explain the shift in his direct attacks on Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign versus his more veiled critiques post-Election Day. "I think it fundamentally poisons the relationship with numerous countries", Peter Lewis, director of African Studies at Johns Hopkins University, told CNN. Never said "take them out".

In Friday's Facebook post, Clinton said the USA should support Haiti and its people and "help them reach their full potential". "The president and all those attending the meeting know what I said and how I feel".

Both Republican and Democratic senators had been working for months to craft legislation that would protect 700,000 young adults who were brought into the USA illegally as children and later shielded from deportation under a programme known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

The AU representative said they were alarmed by Trump's "very racist" comments.

Democratic senator Dianne Feinstein called the comments "beneath the dignity of the presidency" and said Trump's desire to see more immigrants from countries like Norway was "an effort to set this country back generations by promoting a homogeneous, white society".

"Following comments by the president, I said my piece directly to him yesterday", said Graham, who was part of a bipartisan proposal on immigration that Trump rejected at the meeting. The statement also noted that the president wanted immigrants who "contribute" and can "assimilate".