Electronics

GM and Cruise reveal their fourth-generation, steering wheel-free Cruise AV

GM and Cruise reveal their fourth-generation, steering wheel-free Cruise AV

Above: GM: Fourth generation vehicle, the Cruise AV. It will have other accommodations for hearing and visually impaired customers. It says these aren't relevant because the vehicle doesn't have manual controls. In other states - including those that stipulate a auto must have a licensed human driver - GM will work with regulators to change or get a waiver from existing rules.

The appeal has been filed to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration seeking permission for deploying the new autonomous auto fleet designed with Chevrolet Bolt EV platform. Most of those companies have one or more partners.

Kyle Vogt, the chief executive officer at Cruise Automation, a software developing unit for GM's driver-less cars, based in San Francisco, said in a statement that, "What's really special about this is if you look back 20 years from now, it's the first auto without a steering wheel and pedals".

GM spokesman Kevin Kelly said the first of the autonomous Chevrolet Bolts is being tested.

GM is part of a growing throng of vehicle manufacturers, technology companies and tech startups seeking to develop so-called robo-taxis over the next three years in North America, Europe and Asia.

Father of slain Pakistani girl blames police for slow action
The clarification stated that the chief justice had only referred to a news item that had gone viral on social media. They also called out the incompetence of the police at handling child abduction cases in the region.

But there are some logistical hurdles for GM to clear for what Wired calls its "robo-chariot", including getting the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to let 2,500 of the cars (the maximum number allowed) off the hook on 16 safety requirements, such as having an airbag in the steering wheel-moot as there's no steering wheel.

GM sees the announcement Friday as a significant step toward the widespread adoption of self-driving vehicle technology.

Most of those companies have one or more partners.

At a November 30 briefing in San Francisco, Mr Ammann told investors the lifetime revenue generation of one of its self-driving cars could eventually be 'several hundred thousands of dollars'. With the Cruise AV, there is no such option.

Based on the Chevy Bolt, the electric Cruise AV will initially be employed in a ride-hailing capacity and operate within a pre-determined, well-mapped "geo-fenced" area, so it won't be entirely off the leash.