Science

SpaceX scheduled to test fire Falcon Heavy rocket Thursday

SpaceX scheduled to test fire Falcon Heavy rocket Thursday

Image the second stage of the Falcon 9 in the skies over Sudan appeared on numerous pictures in the network, which indirectly confirms normal operation of the rocket SpaceX.

SpaceX said Tuesday that the rocket worked fine, but its statement left open the possibility that something could have gone wrong after the launch.

Northrop Grumman - which provided the satellite for an undisclosed US government entity - said it can not comment on classified missions.

In 2015, SpaceX was certified by the U.S. Air Force to launch national security satellites.

As far as we can tell from reporting by both the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg, the Zuma satellite failed to successfully separate from the upper stage.

SpaceX did not report any problems with the launch; however, while the company usually announces a successful launch regardless of the classification of the payload, no confirmation was given by SpaceX or Northrup Grumman, the company that manufactured the secret satellite.

DeMarco Murray ruled out vs. Patriots
They are coming off a bye week after posting the best record in the AFC and they are rested and ready to go. It doesn't really matter what happens outside of this facility, and what we're trying to accomplish.

Matt Desch, chief executive officer of satellite operator Iridium Communications Inc., said that as the launch contractor, Northrop Grumman deserves the blame for the loss last weekend of the satellite, which is presumed to have crashed into the ocean in the secretive mission code-named Zuma. Meanwhile, theories are emerging that the United States government-backed Zuma was a satellite meant to monitor or intercept nuclear activities by North Korea.

After launch, SpaceX returned the tall portion of the Falcon 9 rocket to an upright landing at Cape Canaveral. The company chose SpaceX as the launch provider, noting late previous year that it took "great care to ensure the most affordable and lowest risk scenario for Zuma".

However, cameras did not follow stage two of the rocket, and reports suggest Zuma may not have reached its final orbit.

SpaceX has been rapidly expanding its launch business, which includes NASA, national security and commercial missions.

The Falcon 9 with Zuma kicked off on 8 January 2018 to 04:00 Moscow time from the cosmodrome on Cape Canaveral.

The company has not said when exactly the rocket's engines will fire. Shotwell said in her statement the company "does not anticipate any impact on the upcoming launch schedule" at the end of the month since the data reviewed so far "indicates that no design, operational or other changes are needed". "We are also preparing for an F9 launch for SES and the Luxembourg Government from SLC-40 in three weeks". It was originally scheduled for static fire Thursday.