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Trump's United Kingdom excuse blames Obama for Bush's embassy deal

Trump's United Kingdom excuse blames Obama for Bush's embassy deal

While Trump had claimed that he called off the visit because he didn't want to open the new USA embassy in south London and termed the decision to move the building from Mayfair to Vauxhall as a "bad deal".

U.S. President Donald Trump cancelled a trip to London scheduled for next month to open a new embassy, blaming Barack Obama for selling off the old one for "peanuts" in a bad deal.

The new 12-storey, cube-shaped building, designed by American architects KieranTimberlake, is located in a regenerated area on the south bank of the River Thames.

Johnson, a Trump appointee, also said the new embassy was entirely paid for by the sale of other London properties and "did not cost the US taxpayer a cent".

Trump said he will not participate in the inauguration function of the embassy.

"London mayor Sadiq Khan tweeted Trump had "got the message" that he was not welcome, referring to the backlash over the Queen's invitation".

"The US and United Kingdom are strong, resilient partners and allies; we do more together than any other two countries in the world".

The spokesman added: "A state visit (invitation) has been extended and accepted and we will confirm the details in due course".

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Almost two million British people added their names to an online petition in 2017 calling for Trump's visit to be downgraded from a state visit to avoid embarrassing the queen. "Bad deal. Wanted me to cut ribbon-NO!", Trump tweeted.

Residents in the up and coming area of Nine Elms got to see the US President after all when the world-famous museum relocated their life-size waxwork of the former reality star from Baker Street to outside the new $1 billion US embassy.

There had been speculation that the trip would be merged with a planned state visit to Britain offered to Trump by Prime Minister Theresa May. In December, Ambassador Woody Johnson said he was looking forward to welcoming the president when he visited. The uproar came after Trump re-tweeted three anti-Muslim videos posted by a leader of the far-right group Britain First - a tiny group that regularly posts inflammatory videos.

Trump's cancellation was met with humour on social media, with parodies of the president's tweet trending on Twitter.

Labour lawmaker David Lammy, who had vowed to lead a protest against Trump if he visited, said the USA president was "too scared of us Londoners, who don't want him darkening our door".

The mayor, a member of the main opposition Labour party, said there would have been "mass peaceful protests", and that it had been a "mistake" to invite him.

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said opponents such as Khan were putting the relationship with the United States, the biggest investor in Britain, at risk. "We will not allow US-UK relations to be endangered by some puffed-up, pompous popinjay in City Hall".